Photos of Bangkok’s Temple of Dawn : Wat Arun

View of Wat Arun Showing the Monkeys and Demons that Support the Towers

View of Wat Arun Showing the Monkeys and Demons that Support the Towers

Wat Arun  also called the “Temple of Dawn” is one of Bangkok’s most famous Buddhist temples. Located on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River it is probably best known to visitors of Thailand because it is featured on much of the coinage.

Demon Holding Wat Arun in Bangkok

Demon Holding the Temple

The temple, which was originally built in the 17th century, is named after the Hindu god Aruna who is often depicted as the embodiment of the rising sun. At sunrise the temple’s spires, which are encrusted with ancient shards of broken Chinese porcelain and seashells, reflect sunlight giving the temple a sort of glow.

Buddha at the Temple of Dawn in Bangkok

Buddha at the Temple of Dawn in Bangkok

It is a fun place to visit particularly because of the views of the river and just climbing the extremely steep stairs is an adventure. It is impressive to look at from a distance but it is the details that make it more interesting.

View of the Chao Phraya River from Wat Arun

View of the Chao Phraya River from Wat Arun

 

Steep Stars Leading the the Upper Level of Wat Arun

Steep Stars Leading the the Upper Level of Wat Arun

Detail of the Chinese Porcelain that Decorates Wat Arun

Detail of the Chinese Porcelain that Decorates Wat Arun

Images made with a Canon EOS 6D 20.2 MP Full Frame DSLR with theEF24-105mm IS Lens Kit.

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Author: Jonathan Look

In 2011 Jonathan Look decided to change his life and pursue adventures instead of comfort and possessions. His goal is to travel the world solo; one country at a time, one year at a time. To accomplish this he got rid of most of his possessions, packed up what little he saw as necessities and headed out. His goal is to spend ten years discovering new places, meeting new people and taking the time to learn about them, their values and their place on this tiny planet. He embraces the philosophy that says a person is the sum of their experiences and rejects the fraud of modern consumerism that makes people into slaves of their consumption. He doesn’t intend to be modern day ascetic, just more mindful of his place in the world and to make decisions according to that new standard.

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