Poutine – What You See is What You Get

Poutine is a traditional dish of Quebec, Canada.

Poutine is a traditional dish of Quebec, Canada.

Poutine is a uniquely Québécois Canadian dish comprised of french fries and cheese curd topped with brown gravy. In my previous travels to Canada I had somehow missed Poutine, but while traveling this summer it seemed to be everywhere. Pubs, fast-food chains, road-side diners and even a few stand alone Poutine stands were offering the now ubiquitous Canadian favorite.

Poutine is pretty much one of those what you see is what you get kind of dishes. The brown gravy is supposed to be a salty, thin chicken, veal or turkey, but I think many places are cheating and using pre-packaged, powdered gravy. The cheese curds are supposed to be of a special cooked then cured variety, to give them an almost tangy taste, and they were pretty universally good.  And the french fries are, well, french fries. The quality and style is pretty much dependent on where you buy them.

We probably had poutine five or six times while we were in Quebec. It is cheap, easy to eat and very filling. I never had one that I would consider delicious, but I never had one that wasn’t “not too bad”. Every one of them was a “gut bomb”. Next time I go to Canada I will probably give it another try. In the mean time, I won’t really worry with seeking it out.

Followup: In the last few months I have decided to put some ads on my site. For this post I was trying to find a Canadian cookbook, but I couldn’t find one.

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Author: Jonathan Look

In 2011 Jonathan Look decided to change his life and pursue adventures instead of comfort and possessions. His goal is to travel the world solo; one country at a time, one year at a time. To accomplish this he got rid of most of his possessions, packed up what little he saw as necessities and headed out. His goal is to spend ten years discovering new places, meeting new people and taking the time to learn about them, their values and their place on this tiny planet. He embraces the philosophy that says a person is the sum of their experiences and rejects the fraud of modern consumerism that makes people into slaves of their consumption. He doesn't intend to be modern day ascetic, just more mindful of his place in the world and to make decisions according to that new standard.

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